Glorious Din Record reviews

 

Watching this video gives me chills and brings me back to one of the most inspiring nights I ever had in my life! While living in San Francisco in ’84, I got the chance to see a rare show by TRIAL that totally blew my mind, but GLORIOUS DIN, who opened that night, transformed me. That night I realized I must start a band, and the next day me and my homie Gary started D & E (DIVERSE & EFFECTIVE). GLORIOUS DIN was one of the most outstanding post punk bands to ever create music, but what’s interesting is that most people have never heard of them. This is why CVLT Nation is so ultra stoked to share with you a very rare video of a GLORIOUS DIN concert from 1986. THIS BAND CREATED TIMELESS MUSIC THAT STILL MOVES ME TO THIS DAY!

http://www.cvltnation.com/glorious-din/

 

http://lost-in-tyme.ucoz.com/blog/2008-06-30-245

San Francisco, mid/late 80s: a "secret" scene is burgeoning. World of Pooh, Glorious Din, Caroliner Rainbow, Archipelago Brewing Company are some names that made amazing, original and uncompromising music. Eric Cope, had already moved with his band White Front from Iowa to SF and was already part of this. After forming Glorious Din (a band between Bauhaus and REM, as it was said), he founded Insight Record and Tapes label to release his (and others) music. Except the two Glorious Din records, Cope released records by Spahn Ranch from Detroit, Beatnigs and Comic Book Opera and his magnum opus, this 2LP compilation with 30 songs by 15 bands.

Almost 20 years ago, I was in a record shop specializing in difficult records imports, searching though the vinyls that had just arrived. My budget was limited and, as this was a double LP (which means it costed more) I purchased a couple of records, that I considered more urgent, and put "Kerosene" in next week's buying schedule. As you can imagine, the following week there was no sight of the only copy that had appeared under the sun of Greece - until a few days ago.

About a year ago Fritz Die Spinne and Curious Guy posted Glorious Din's "Leading Stolen Horses" and "Closely Watched Trains" respectivelly, so I've started to search for it again. I didn't find it, but a couple months lated I posted Spahn Ranch's "Thickly Settled" (thanks to Rob Rude), and later World of Pooh's "Land of Thirst". Finally, a couple months back, "Kerosene" appeared on eBay and my best friend Opa-Loka took care of the rest.

Although I was familiar with some other bands on "Kerosene", like the Beatnigs, World of Pooh and Caroliner Rainbow, I didn't imagine how rich was this (San Fransico/Oakland mostly) scene of the late 80s:
Eric Cope who was in Glorious Din, Beetle Leg and Dog Food (the later two I suspect were one-off collaborations) the "usual suspects" Brandan Kearney (World of Pooh, Dog Food and Caroliner), Jay Paget (World of Pooh, Glorious Din and Harry's Picket Fence), Matt Hall (Stiff Legged Sheep and Beetle Leg) and Pete H (drummer from the days of White Front, later on Glorious Din with Cope and in Harry's Picket Fence with Paget) seems to be the core of this. 

There were 15 bands (and 30 songs) compiled, in this double LP set, which I think it was the swansong of Insight Records and Tapes. There's nothing about Eric Cope after this. 
But "To Sell Kerosene Door To Door" was his greater achievement: a massive collection of the ultra-under-avant-garde scene, with his personal seal on it. It's amazing how the totally different sound of the more hard bands like Beatnigs and Stickdog could be side-by-side with the rendition of "Black Betty" by Caroliner or the big-as-the-sea "Thickly Settled" by Spahn Ranch or the weird ballads of World of Pooh ("Mr Coffee Nerves") and Cope's own sad folk anthems with Dog Food. For many of the 15 bands this is their only released output (not that the few that did released something else are more known - except maybe to the visitors of this blog and the 2 blogs mentioned above).

This is a compilation that could haunt you

 

 

 

 

Braver Magazine

P.O. Box 3877

Berkeley, CA  94703

 Glorious Din

Leading Stolen Horses

Insight records

 

Listening to this record, I think of two things: 1) a lot of people say about Glorious Din, “they don’t think they’re joy division, they are Joy division” and 2) at the end of (or what turned out to be the end) of the only live performance I’ve seen of them- it was at the YMCA, I believe –the singer, Eric Cope, kicked over a Congo drum and started swinging a mike stand back and forth in such a manner that Einsturzende Neubauten would want him in their band, except that he wasn’t swinging it at the audience but at the other band members. A bunch of people leapt on him, de-milking him in the process, forming what we used to call in collage a ‘pigpile’ until he convinced them that he would be submissive for a while. They let him up and he we berserk again. Finally they dragged him out into the foyer, where he sat until I passed him on my way out. I remember thinking, “What the hell do you say to the guy? ‘Good show’?” 

If any one out there knows if Ian Curtis used to do that, let me know. I never saw Joy Division, but I have they’re records and sure Eric sounds a bit like old Ian but the rest of the band doesn’t sound like JD at all. Paget’s guitar-playing remind me of Bruce Licher’s in savage republic, trebly or fuzzed out drones which evoke imagery of the desert and the orient. Pete H’s drumming, I don’t know, you might find something similar Peter Gabriel’s third Peter Gabriel album.

The cover graphics complement the music pretty well. Neat, precise, understated. No crashing cymbals or long cascading moans on this album, and you don’t expect them either. G. Din are much less concerned with industrial angst than JD were, so you can just forget about comparing them any more. Some of the more agrarian/third world/mystery and darkness songs are Water from the Temple, Insects, the title cut, and tenement roofs.

Recommended.

 

                        -Seymour Grass

 

 

 

 

 

Troubled Times             

P.o. Box 1539            

Santa Cruz, CA 95061-1539            

Glorious Din Leading Stolen Horses

Insight Records            

 

This eight song LP is the first one ever by the San Francisco based post-punk band Glorious Din. Glorious Din’s music is very stream lined and driving, with catchy, melodic and chorused bass hooks prominent in the mix, and a sparse, repetitive and haunting guitar overlay. The deep, low growl of lead singer Eric Cope is remnant of the late Ian Curtis of Joy Division, and comparisons of Glorious Din to Joy Division are inevitable. However, unlike some other post-punk bands, the riffs are not recycled; the songs are well written, very original and emotionally powerful. The music on Leading Stolen Horses conjures up melancholy; a gentle sadness and sorrow, rather than the violent nilism, harsh alienation and hopelessness more commonly found in this genre. Most of the songs are of a medium-fast tempo, with the important exceptions of the songs ‘cello tape’ and ‘insects’, the last two songs on sides one and two respectively. The album opens up with ‘Tenement Roofs’, which has some very nice bass harmonics above the bass riff, while a muted guitar strut helps drive the song percussively. ‘Water From The Temple’, has an almost tribal quality to the drumming. ‘Cello Tape’ is, in my opinion, Glorious Dins magnum opus, reflecting deep loneliness and need for friendship. Overall this album is well produced, and yet still has a very human feel to it. Leading Stolen Horses is a very promising debut from a band with great potential.

                                                                                                

                                                                                                -Anatol Sucher  

 

 

Leading Stolen Horses

Glorious Din

Insight Records

 

By Ralph Heibutzki

 First, lets get some facts straight. 

Rock ‘n’ Roll given #1: Glorious Din has been pegged along with the  “raincoat brigade style”, you know: bands who sing about jumping off bridges when the rent’s overdue, and when the eviction notice comes in (Joy Division, Bauhaus, Public Image, “industrial noise” car bleeders like Throbbing Gristle, psychic TV). Not everybody’s cup of tea right? 

Rock ‘n’ Roll given #2:  Most of the “raincoat brigade ” bands have outlived their usefulness, either banging and farting like drill presses, or lapsing into musical comas (long before their audience’s did).

Rock ‘n’ Roll given #3: “Leading Stolen Horses” is probably the best album that Joy Division never made.

Rock ‘n’ Roll given #4: So what? Artistically that’s no crime and we’ve got a promising post-punk debut here. A winner in the Alienated Spike-Hair Young Artists Sweepstakes.

Glorious Din’s secret weapon is the singer Eric Cope, whose growls and subterranean delivery recalls Jim Morrison minus the Jack Daniels, or Nick Cave on Tuinals. Maybe even a growling Ian Curtis, in tux and tails, trying out for the Metropolitan Opera.

Cope’s voice and Paget’s buzzing, mile-a-minute guitar knock you out when paired effectively, such as on “Cello Tape”, “Stolen Horses’” porky prime cut. Quiet acoustic guitar builds into Cope holding his notes, long enough to grow moss, while he spills out his visions of hard knocks, harsh realities: “Would it be worth to burn the city twice/when nothing is wrong/can’t blame you the feelings, the feelings/the feelings, the feelings are gone.”

Doug Heeschen’s bass gooses the song onward, a lone voice of sanity in Glorious Din’s musical wilderness. A brief double-tracked vocal shoves the song to an unsettling climax, leaving one with a feeling of “No easy answers here.”

The title track also soar off my battered turntable, as Paget’s guitar hits a groove like a car trapped in a snowdrift. Lyrics are hard to decode but when Cope sings about “walls crashing in”, I’d look twice next time at my brand new split-level stucco booby-trap.

 As on other song Heeschen’s bass assume the dominant melodic role, while Paget’s guitar takes a definite back seat. This is where all the trouble starts, because post –punk dynamic need something to break up the constant repetitive melodies. Glorious Din’s music is tough to get a handle on, because no screams, solos, or rim shots break up the haze. I don’t know if it’s perversity or just plain reluctance, but I wish these guys would pull out all the stops more often, such as on “Insects”, where Pete H.’s drums spin the song into a dimension where nobody’s head stays on straight. Just when the droning guitar threatens to sink into monotony, the song kicks into over drive, a pleasant surprise to these ears.

However, I’d like to hear this more often. “Tenement Roofs”, “Arrival”, “Water from the temple”, all zip past with out stroking my frontal lobes. Glorious Din pulls their punches when they should muss their gloves. Although the group plays tight and cohesive, it seems too restrained at times.  I’m not advocating that Eric Cope and Co. go and buy 10 Marshall Amplifier cabinets: theirs so much power in these grooves, waiting to be unleashed. Let’s see what happens next time.

As for the Joy Division comparisons, which many have pinned on them, I see no real problems, and only to definite lifts: “Insects’” galloping drum rolls recall “Atrocity exhibition”, while “Sixth Pillar” reminds fans of “Disorder”.  However Glorious Din’s approach is far more subterranean then Joy Division ever was, burrowing underneath the listeners consciousness for a subtler effect. If you only play Joy Division at midnight then this music’s for 3:00 am, when your coming down from the depression “Love Will Tear Us Apart” inflicts. There’s a big difference, believe me. Again, a little more energy should sink these bands next releases firmly under your skin, ready to blow your wig off.

Live they probably simmer like a firecracker, as this “Breaver” review indicates: “A bunch of people leapt on him, de-milking him in the process, forming what we used to call in collage a ‘pigpile’ until he convinced them that he would be submissive for a while. They let him up and he we berserk again. Finally they dragged him out into the foyer, where he sat until I passed him on my way out. I remember thinking, “What the hell do you say to the guy? ‘Good show’?” 

Glorious Din will tour Michigan this month so for conformation dates please call 415-861-7649.

 

 

 

THE METRO

Leading Stolen Horses

Glorious Din

Insight Records

 

Glorious Din hail from San Francisco, that city on the bay that most rockers connect to either the 60’s psychedelia of Grateful Dead and the Jefferson Airplane or to the 80”s pop muzak of Journey or Huey Lewis. What most people don’t know is that there’s a growing and vital underground music scene in northern California that takes its influence from darker, less cosmetically appealing sources. Such at Glorious Din…

Leading Stolen Horses is Glorious Din’s first album for their hometown Insight Records and it is one spooky mo-fo piece of vinyl. Glorious Din walks the same broken city sidewalks and starlit, rain-slicked backstreets as society’s most disturbed poets and madmen. Heavily influenced by English, Doom-and-Gloom bands such as Joy Division and Throbbing Gristle, Glorious Din manages to work mainline rock sound into a convoluted, artistic statement without lapsing into the use of mere noise and volume to underline their statement of society’s ruin, (unlike, say Sonic Youth who, though a greatly talented group of players, tend to jerk off instead of stretching their abilities). The lyrical content of is either hidden in the mix or shouted above the instrumental cries and at its most disturbing, chills to the marrow. As I said, some of the materials here are down right spooky: “Cello Tape” and “Tenement Roofs” and the title cut come to mind. Underlying it all, however, is an optimistic tread that creates a glimmer of hope. Glorious Din are on the razor edge of the avant grade, sharing a heritage of genius and insight with such literary heroes as Artaud and Rimbaud.

                                                

                                                                                    -Keith A. Gordon

 

 

 

 

Glorious Din            

Leading Stolen Horses

 

With Leading Stolen Horses, Glorious Din succeed where many bands have failed- specifically, at taking inspiration from Joy Division and forming their own sound from it. The Joy Division influence is obvious, but something less personal than Ian Curtis’ shattering vision comes forth. Where Curtis captured the universal imagination through the telling of his own despair, Glorious Din evokes a wider rhythm, like the voice of a wandering people. This tribal sense flows through out the record, especially in the Arabic guitar style and chanting, muffled vocals. Somebody here has obviously been listening to religious music of various cultures, as the feeling of in vocation is strong in this music. The contemporary world is not completely abandoned- “stealing water from the temple” almost has the happy-western feel of love tractor- but the overall tone aim for a level more archetypical than most.

 

 

Leading Stolen Horses…GLORIOUS DIN Review

0

Avant Garde,Music,Positive Punk

 

One of the best shows I went to in San Francisco during 1984 was the Glorious Din & Trial gig. This show really changed my life & made realize that I had to follow my dreams. Both of these bands were local bands, but they had created this killer post-punk sound that could hold its’ own with any band from anywhere. Around this time, Glorious Din released their classic album Leading Stolen Horses. This album is a post-punk gem that many people have never heard – trust me, after one listen you will be hooked. Every song on Leading Stolen Horses will touch your spirit in some way. I can’t front, their singer Eric Cope could be compared to Ian Curtis, but honestly to me he had his own twisted vocal delivery. Glorious Din songs had these rad tribal drums that cascaded around your skull & then waltzed with your brain cells. What’s strange is that when I was younger, I believed this album gave me intelligence – with each listen, I learned more about my being.The guitar licks on this album are catchy & eternal, which puts you in a transcendental state. Their song Cello Tape shows that band was on a plane of their own. Search out this rad band Glorious Din & allow them to paint your world grey!

 

http://lost-in-tyme.ucoz.com/blog/2008-06-30-245

 

San Francisco, mid/late 80s: a "secret" scene is burgeoning. World of Pooh, Glorious Din, Caroliner Rainbow, Archipelago Brewing Company are some names that made amazing, original and uncompromising music. Eric Cope, had already moved with his band White Front from Iowa to SF and was already part of this. After forming Glorious Din (a band between Bauhaus and REM, as it was said), he founded Insight Record and Tapes label to release his (and others) music. Except the two Glorious Din records, Cope released records by Spahn Ranch from Detroit, Beatnigs and Comic Book Opera and his magnum opus, this 2LP compilation with 30 songs by 15 bands.

Almost 20 years ago, I was in a record shop specializing in difficult records imports, searching though the vinyls that had just arrived. My budget was limited and, as this was a double LP (which means it costed more) I purchased a couple of records, that I considered more urgent, and put "Kerosene" in next week's buying schedule. As you can imagine, the following week there was no sight of the only copy that had appeared under the sun of Greece - until a few days ago.


About a year ago Fritz Die Spinne and Curious Guy posted Glorious Din's "Leading Stolen Horses" and "Closely Watched Trains" respectivelly, so I've started to search for it again. I didn't find it, but a couple months lated I posted Spahn Ranch's "Thickly Settled" (thanks to Rob Rude), and later World of Pooh's "Land of Thirst". Finally, a couple months back, "Kerosene" appeared on eBay and my best friend Opa-Loka took care of the rest.

Although I was familiar with some other bands on "Kerosene", like the Beatnigs, World of Pooh and Caroliner Rainbow, I didn't imagine how rich was this (San Fransico/Oakland mostly) scene

 of the late 80s:
Eric Cope who was in Glorious Din, Beetle Leg and Dog Food (the later two I suspect were one-off collaborations) the "usual suspects" Brandan Kearney (World of Pooh, Dog Food and Caroliner), Jay Paget (World of Pooh, Glorious Din and Harry's Picket Fence), Matt Hall (Stiff Legged Sheep and Beetle Leg) and Pete H (drummer from the days of White Front, later on Glorious Din with Cope and in Harry's Picket Fence with Paget) seems to be the core of this. 

There were 15 bands (and 30 songs) compiled, in this double LP set, which I think it was the swansong of Insight Records and Tapes. There's nothing about Eric Cope after this. 
But "To Sell Kerosene Door To Door" was his greater achievement: a massive collection of the ultra-under-avant-garde scene, with his personal seal on it. It's amazing how the totally different sound of the more hard bands like Beatnigs and Stickdog could be side-by-side with the rendition of "Black Betty" by Caroliner or the big-as-the-sea "Thickly Settled" by Spahn Ranch or the weird ballads of World of Pooh ("Mr Coffee Nerves") and Cope's own sad folk anthems with Dog Food. For many of the 15 bands this is their only released output (not that the few that did released something else are more known - except maybe to the visitors of this blog and the 2 blogs mentioned above).

This is a compilation that could haunt you

 

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